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International Research – Lessons from Shanghai

Tongji CAUP International Doctoral School of Future City and Architecture 2017

Over the past two weeks I’ve had the pleasure of attending the Tongji University International Doctoral School of Future City and Architecture, hosted by their College of Architecture and Urban Planning (CAUP) as a representative PhD student from the University of New South Wales (UNSW) in Sydney. This is an intensive two-week program held in Shanghai which invites 100 students from Tongji University, other Asian universities and countries around the world (most of which hold dual-degrees with the university).

The program is aimed to build professional research relationships and friendships, invite doctoral students to extend their training in research design, invite talks from a variety of academic and professional guest lecturers from around the world and to develop ideas for research proposals which can be applied to Shanghai. The content of these (over 30) lectures was broad – from emerging materials science, to new ways of preserving heritage, artificial intelligence in architecture, mobility, vertical urbanism, research methods and simply inspiration for different types of research thinking.

**Left: ‘Vertical Urbanism & Urban Bowls’ – Martin Felsen, Associate Professor / Director of Architecture Program, Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT)

** Top-Right: ‘Research is fun, make it yours!’ – Luca Fabris, Associate Professor, Department of Architecture and Urban Studies, Politecnico Milano

** Bottom-Right: ‘Visualization of Urban Planning Regulation in Japan Using City Engine’ – Shen Zhenjiang – Vice-Head of Graduate School of Environmental Design, Kanazawa University. An excellent talk on how to codify complex planning zoning and building laws in ESRI CityEngine to evaluate both the existing city and future planning proposals. Continue Reading

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Finding the centre point of Sydney

During this year’s GovHack our team was interested in visualising open economic data of Sydney. There were several outputs of the project ; and this was the least sophisticated but ended up the most interesting.

If you were to try and pick the centre of Sydney, where would you say it was? Probably first instinct is just to go where it says ‘Sydney’ on Google Maps, right?

Well we found it. This is the centre of Sydney! Recognise it?

2017-09-21 11_59_49-Durham St - Google Maps

No? Ok. What about this?

2017-09-21 11_58_38-PhotoMaps by nearmap

Still no? Well it is important as this is the forecast central location of Sydney’s projected population in 2040.

We calculated the average location of population and employment in Sydney from 2011 – 2040. This was based on the location of people and jobs in the Bureau of Transport Statistics’ forecasts, using a weighted average location based on the centre of travel zones and population/employment within them. This is what we ended up with (an interactive version below). The blue houses represent population, and the green buildings represent employment. The size of the icon denotes year, from 2011 to 2040.

2017-09-21 11_05_33-Economic Centres Map _ CARTO

As you can see, the forecasts show the centre of each moving west at about 50 metres each year, and it is definitely not very close to the ‘City of Sydney’ LGA as an outsider may expect.

In 2040, sprawling Sydney’s population centre will have moved from Halvorsen Park to Rose Hill, and the employment centre from Rhodes to Wentworth Point.

Some interesting further analysis would be in applying the same method to different cities. While it is a simple calculation it is something worth thinking about – particularly when trying to provide equal transport and social services or all.

Interactive map below:

Datasets: Bureau of Transport Statistics, Transport for NSW – Population and Employment Projection

Here’s an example of a different method applied to London:

London’s Real Centre Point


PopWeighted1

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Liveable Sydney @ Carriageworks

liveable-syd

Arup recently hosted a panel discussion on whether or not Sydney is one of the world’s most liveable cities – and what we can do about it. The guests and panel were diverse in background – creating lively debate from state, local, youth advocacy, social and private sector interests. A summary of the liveable Sydney panel can be found here.

Alongside the event were these visuals, which were largely fuelled by data related to this previous post on accessibility modelling. For me, it was exciting to see how having statistics so up-front, vibrant and personal enabled positive discussion and conversation both before and after the talks (regardless of how grim some of the figures are!).

Liveable Sydney? from Arup Australasia on Vimeo.

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